FORMING HABITS

One thing I want you to take from the course is the importance of making time to draw every day, even if it is just jotting some doodles down on paper. If the only thing you do after taking this course is spend five minutes doodling, you WILL improve over time and it will feel effortless. But how do you make this into a habit?

Charles Duhigg is the author of The Power of Habit, a book I read a year or two ago that helped me understand how changing one piece of my routine, through identifying the reward you get from certain habits and finding a way to get that same reward in a different way. Changing one simple thing can potentially snowball into a series of new and better habits.

How-to-Change-a-Habit

With learning to draw it’s a more challenging thing to develop a habit around, because the reward that you really want starting out is a good drawing. That’s an incredibly hard reward to get to when you are just starting out.

I’m going to ask you to change what you view as successful going forward. Change what the reward is.

Instead of hoping that the drawing turns out great, you need to celebrate that you carved out the time to draw at all, and that effort is OUTSTANDING. Putting time in every day is the most important step to getting the sorts of drawings you really want to be doing. If you are externally motivated (like me) then go jump into the Facebook Group and myself and others will provide moral support. If you are internally motivated, then the reward of having done the work may be enough for you. Still though, it is nice to get (and give) encouragement, so I would urge you to chime in anyway, because honestly, it’s great to see your work at all stages.

Pick winnable battles. 5-15-30 minutes a day to draw is a winnable battle.

FREE DOODLING

Today I want you to pick a page and just doodle. Low pressure. Experiment with things that seemed interesting to you that you haven’t tried yet, draw things you used to draw when you are a kid, things that feel comfortable to you. Just keep your hand moving. To take the pressure off of my thinking I need to make a perfect drawing, I like to grab a ball point pen. No one expects perfection with that as your drawing tool, and the line dances around the paper, you can doodle extremely quickly. Old ugly men are weirdly comforting subjects for me to draw. I tried drawing Finn from Adventure Time from memory, then drew my coffee cup. All fun, low pressure things.

freedoodle

Winnable battles. Pick up a pencil and draw today. You will feel great for having made the time.

 

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1Free doodle something fun, whatever is comfortable for you
2Bring it over to the Facebook Group, let's talk about habits and commit to winnable battles